Applications for new HHMI investigators due June 27

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has launched a national competition to select new HHMI investigators. Researchers are invited to apply who bring original and innovative approaches to the investigation of biological problems in biomedical disciplines, plant biology, evolutionary biology, biophysics, chemical biology, biomedical engineering, and computational biology. Physician scientists are encouraged to participate in the competition. HHMI expects to appoint up to 20 new investigators.

Appropriate scientists are encouraged to participate in this open competition. Eligible candidates apply directly without an institutional nomination, and there are no limits on the number of applicants or awardees from any of the over 200 eligible institutions. More information about the HHMI Investigator Program and this competition may be found at http://www.hhmi.org/inv2018.

In brief, candidates must meet the following eligibility criteria at the time of the application deadline:

  • PhD and/or MD (or the equivalent).
  • Tenured or tenure-track position as an assistant professor or higher academic rank (or the equivalent) at an eligible U.S. institution, which would become the host institution.
  • More than three, but no more than 12, years of post-training, professional experience. To meet this requirement, the applicant’s professional appointment(s) must have begun no earlier than June 1, 2005, and no later than Sept. 1, 2014.
  • Principal investigator on one or more active, national peer-reviewed research grants with an initial duration of at least three years, such as an NIH R01 grant. Mentored awards, career development and training grants do not qualify. Multi-investigator grants may qualify.

The deadline for submission of all application materials is June 27, 2017, at 3 p.m., Eastern Time.

The HHMI review process will include evaluation of applications by distinguished scientists, leading to the selection of semifinalists by early 2018. Following further review, finalists will be selected in the spring of 2018, with appointments to begin as early as Sept. 1, 2018. Institutions with finalists who have not previously hosted an HHMI investigator will be required to enter into a collaborative agreement with HHMI.

HHMI welcomes a diverse and broad applicant pool. Individuals from gender, racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in biomedical research at the career stages targeted by this program are encouraged to apply. As an equal opportunity employer, HHMI does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age or any other characteristic protected under applicable law.

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