Small study finds autism symptoms improve after fecal transplants
Matthew Sullivan

Matthew Sullivan

TDA affiliate Matthew Sullivan, associate professor of microbiology and civil, environmental, and geodetic engineering, has co-authored a study that suggests fecal transplants have positive effects on behavioral symptoms of autism and the gastrointestinal distress that often accompanies them. The small study, published in Microbiome, was lead-authored by Ohio State microbiology PhD candidate Ann Gregory and several collaborators at Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University. Additional researchers at Ohio State contributed to the project. More

 

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