Kogan shares award to analyze politics' impact on learning

kogan2.6cc5a722 (2)TDA affiliate Vladimir Kogan, assistant professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Stéphane Lavertu, associate professor in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs, have received a Lyle Spencer Research Award to help improve understanding of political institutions governing U.S. public education so that they might be designed to promote democratic accountability and the efficient provision of K-12 education. For the Education Governance and Accountability Project, Kogan, Lavertu and their co-principal investigator, Emory University political scientist Zachary Peskowitz, will collect a decade of data on local school district elections across 20 states and apply rigorous statistical techniques to understand how the politics of public education affect school administration, instruction and student learning. More

Share this page
Suggested Articles
From Theory to Practice: Generating Value from Big Data

The past several years have seen a growing focus on big data, data science, and data analytics that spans a spectrum—from fundamental issues related to the management of large-scale and...

TDA to host "Big Data for Good" Fall Forum

Does big data really matter? It does if you put it to work in solving today’s complex challenges. TDA’s 2016 Fall Forum will focus on “Big Data for Good,” a special...

Why some friends make you feel more supported than others

It’s good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it – but it’s even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a...

USAID FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS

USAID is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for several fellowship programs for scientists and engineers. These fellowships provide a firsthand experience of working in the government....

Doodling with trig and loops

Trigonometry visualized in Excel OK, to start let me be clear about something: What you are seeing here isn’t the result of my current research. I didn’t spend months laboring...